Monday, June 27, 2005

Sunshine Policy Discussion

Hi Classmates, I want to discuss about the "Sunshine Policy." We know it failed. No personal, just related to the class discussion.

I support the "Sunshine Policy". First of all, look at the result. On the unification day, the whole world saw that Kim Jong-il shaking hands with Kim Dao Jung and showing his kindness instead he hid himself at home. He is a jerk, we know that. But we don't have to point fingers to his face to criticize him. Second, South Korea brothers/sisters really know how to deal with their enemies after years they have competed. Because of different culture, Americans know them but they are "too harder" and "harsh". Our Professor mentioned the unification does not help solve the nuclear problem. How do we know they that make friends with N.K. could not? Maybe they can "sneak" and figure out one way to deal with Kim.


How about America, Japan, or Taiwan invited Kim out of his door? The situation in Asia may change.

4 comments:

Chris Hartley said...

I feel the sunshine policy was a great idea to bring peace on the Korean penninsula, and a necessary step toward a possible future unification. However, I do not think it could help curb the DPRK's nuclear ambitions. South Korea knows that a nuclear armed North won't pose any primary threat. I feel that the Sunshine policy increases dialogue between Kim Jong Il and the ROK. The ROK delegates could then report to American officials about Mr. Kim's negotiating style, his personality, and any other characteristic that seems to be a mystery about the man.

eric d said...

It seems that these talks were really initiated by simply bribing North Korean players. If that's the case, is it worth learning about Kim's negotiating style at the cost of financing the NK uranium extraction program?

eric d said...

http://www.time.com/time/asia/covers/501030324/nk_sunshine.html

simsima325 said...

But isn't the intention of the Sunshine Policy to eventually end in Korean reunification? I find most of it concentrates on propping up the regime, even when they do things that cause negative attention to be brought to North Korea. Is this really helping? I understand that they are trying to draw the process out to avoid German-like pitfalls of reunification, but I don't really see any policy implementation that focuses on a longterm plan (even if it is one sided) for reunification.