Monday, May 29, 2006

North Korean culture appreciated in the South

I recently read this article in the New York Times where it said that a North Korean restaurant was very popular despite its bad service. What was most surprising was the fact that this restaurant was in the South. Since when have South Koreans embraced North Korean culture? As far as I could remember (a few years ago, actually a couple of years ago when I last went to Korea) North Korea was supposed to be "BAD!"
It is weird how perspectives can change.

Check it out
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/25/world/asia/25korea.html?_r=1&n=Top%2fNews%2fWorld%2fCountries%20and%20Territories%2fNorth%20Korea&oref=slogin

5 comments:

Berkin Aslan "Turk" said...

I hadn't realized that there was a difference between North and South Korean cuisines. Is there a significant difference?

Ji-young Park said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Ji-young Park said...

Of course there is a difference! Even between different regions of South Korea there is a significant difference in choice of preference in food tastes, types of spices used etc. Although something like 'kimchi' is universal throughout Korea, even with 'kimchi' there are over a hundred different kinds of 'kimchi' and depending on the region how spicy they are, what type of 'kimchi' is the region's specialty are very different.

These are interesting sites about 'kim chi' and Korea in general, if you are interested.

http://www.lifeinkorea.com/culture/kimchi/kimchi.cfm

http://www.kimchi.or.kr/eng/main.jsp


Below is also an article on 'kim chi', titled: "Korean dish 'may cure bird flu'".

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4347443.stm

tkpark said...

And I am also sure that the North Koreans would have liked to differentiate themselves from the South Koreans.

tkpark said...

I have a question though... Did they find out why kimchi helps "cure" the bird flu and SARS? I mean, as the BBC article posted above clearly shows, "The researchers said the results were far from scientifically proven and if kimchi did have the effects they observed, it was unclear why." Is this a case of an urban myth or just unexplainable truth?